of ivory and flesh – statues also suffer. Marlene Monteiro Freitas. Photo: Hervé Véronèse

of ivory and flesh – statues also suffer. Marlene Monteiro Freitas. Photo: Hervé Véronèse

of ivory and flesh – statues also suffer. Marlene Monteiro Freitas. Photo: Hervé Véronèse

of ivory and flesh – statues also suffer. Marlene Monteiro Freitas. Photo: Hervé Véronèse

of ivory and flesh – statues also suffer. Marlene Monteiro Freitas. Photo: Hervé Véronèse

of ivory and flesh – statues also suffer

Marlene Monteiro Freitas

Seven statues wake up to a new life on stage. They move mechanically to the rhythms of pop music, oriental sounds and live percussion as they try to transform themselves into humans. 
 

Marlene Monteiro Freitas draws upon Ovid’s tale of the sculptor Pygmalion whose immortal love of an ivory statue makes it come alive and studies this poetic metamorphosis with and ensemble of music and dancers. The audience is invited to a ball populated by grotesque figures and statues that move clumsily and jerkily, almost like puppets, yet infused with inner yearnings for feeling and love. 

Read the article Marlene Monteiro Freitas: Choreographing Openness about Freitas' choreographic universe.